Tag Archive | World War I

Ernest and Harry Proven, 100 Years Later

Pte. Ernest Albert Proven

One hundred years ago today, on April 12, 1917, my great-great uncle Private Ernest Albert Proven, succumbed to wounds received during the assault on Vimy Ridge three days prior. His brother, Lance Corporal (later Sergeant) Harry Proven survived the attack but was killed a year-and-a-half later, on September 29, 1918.

Sgt. Harry James Proven

Today, I’m happy to announce that two lakes in Northern Manitoba have been named in their honour. Ernest Proven Lake and Harry Proven Lake are among thirteen lakes were named after Manitoban soldiers who died during the First World War. Coverage of the event, held on Monday at the Manitoba Legislative Building, is available by clicking here.

Ernest Proven Lake

Harry Proven Lake

I am extremely happy to have played a small part in remembering these two men and a special thanks goes out to Des Kappel for making this possible.

More information about the two brothers is available by clicking here and here.

“Men of Vimy”

 

“They were the men of the Canadian Veterans’ Guards. Old soldiers who had not faded away but who have returned to serve with their sons.”

An appropriate video considering the 98th anniversary of Vimy Ridge on April 9. The Canadian Army Newsreels series was produced by the Canadian Army Film Unit during the war with the intention of showcasing the Canadian war effort to those back home. Albeit brief, the video shows some footage of the General Duty Company of the Veterans’ Guard of Canada, attached to the Canadian Military Headquarters in London, England.

Mother’s Day – 1918

e001481460 (November 1917 Q12-30 War Diary, p. 203)

1918 Mother’s Day Stationary from the YMCA. Source: Library and Archives Canada

I haven’t been able to do any further research but apparently the YMCA produced stationery specifically for soldiers writing home for Mother’s Day. I can’t imagine the YMCA thought that this would be used by a Canadian Forestry Corps company to record some productions statistics but it looks like they used anything on hand.

Anyways, Happy Mother’s Day!

Pte. Ernest Albert Proven, 1895-1917

Ernie

Ernest Albert Proven, 1916.

Today marks the 97th anniversary of the Canadian assault on Vimy Ridge. Among the thousands of Canadian soldiers who went “over-the-top” that fateful morning were two of my great-great uncles, Harry and Ernest Proven. While Harry survived the attack (read more about him here), his younger brother was not so lucky.

On December 13, 1895, James and Harriet Proven of Clanwilliam, Manitoba, welcomed the birth of their son, Ernest Albert Proven. Ernest, or Ernie, was eventually one of three children; his older brother, Harry, was born two years previous, and his younger brother, Sidney, was born in 1896.

Shortly before war broke out in 1914, Ernie and Sid purchased land in the Alonsa area and started working on homesteads there. I do not know where the Proven brothers were war was declared but like the many prairie farming families, they were likely more concerned with their crops than war in Europe. This, however, would soon change as his older brother, Harry, enlisted in January 1915 with the 45th Battalion.

On March 18, 1916, Ernie and a number of the Clanwilliam boys not yet in uniform attended a recruiting rally. There, alongside fourteen of his comrades, twenty-one year old Ernest Proven volunteered his services for Lt. Col. Glen Campbell’s 107th Battalion.

Following a brief stay in Winnipeg, Ernie and the 107th Battalion relocated to Camp Hughes for summer training. Here, the men of the 107th Battalion trained in the mock trench system, practiced marksmanship, learned how to throw grenades, and prepared for life at the front.

scan0053 copy 2

Ernie and three unidentified friends, 1916.

On September 13, 1916, Ernie and the 107th Battalion left Camp Hughes and began their journey East. Stopping briefly in Winnipeg for a final send-off, the Manitoba Free Press remarked the “…platforms were quickly converted into one mass of humanity.” Some ten thousand people had gathered to send off the 107th and two other local battalions. Allowed to detrain for half an hour, the battalion’s men did their best to find their friends and family and spend some final time with them before heading overseas. As the paper reported, the men of the three battalions, “with bronzed faces and stout hearts took a farewell of their relatives and friends…” who had gathered at the station.

The battalion arrived in Halifax a few days later and was quickly loaded upon the S.S. Olympic, the sister ship of the RMS Titanic. With 6,000 men on board, the Olympic left Halifax on September 19, 1916 and arrived in England without incident on September 24.

Ernie’s time in England was brief, spent mostly at Camp Witley in Surrey. In December 1916, Ernie recieved notice that he was to proceed to France for service with Harry’s battalion, the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles (CMRs). Upon arrival in France, Ernie spent the next two months at a depot camp training and preparing for the rigors of trench warfare.

Ernie finally joined the 1st CMRs on February 14, 1917. Assigned to “D” Company with his brother Harry, Ernie was also joined by some of the Clanwilliam boys he had enlisted with almost a year previous. Soon after, Ernie and Harry and their Clanwilliam friends Fred Minns, Herman Klemet, Nelson Graham, and Hugh Sanderson got together to take a souvenir photograph. As the sender of the photograph, Herman Klemet noted, they expected to return to the trenches soon. He was not wrong.

1CMR Group copy

Back (L to R): Ernie Proven, Harry Proven, Fred Minns, Herman Klemet
Front: Hugh Sanderson, Nelson Graham

In mid-February, the Canadian Expeditionary Force began training for the eventual assault of Vimy Ridge. On March 21, 1917, the unit moved into the front lines but Ernie’s here, however, was fortunately uneventful.

On April 5, Ernie, Harry, and the rest of “D” and “C” Companies, moved into the front lines in preparation for the assault.

In the early hours April 9, 1917, the twenty-four officers and 890 other ranks of the 1st CMRs moved from the dugouts to the jumping-off trenches (highlighted in blue on the map below), from which they would begin the assault. The battalion was assigned to take three objectives: the German Front line (red), the Swischen Stellung Trench (green), and a Sunken Road (yellow). Harry, Ernie, and the rest of “D” Company was assigned the first enemy trench systems (red) and clean up any resistance as the rest of the battalion pushed forward. Once this was completed, the company was told to move forward and help capture the other objectives.

e001124832 (April 1917, p. 63) - Map Edit 2

Map showing the objectives of the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles at Vimy. Source: Library and Archives Canada

At 5:30 am, friendly artillery opened fire on the German lines and, three minutes later, the whistle blew.

Ernie, Harry, and the rest of “D” Company climbed out of the trenches and led the assault. The company kept close to the creeping barrage and the men struggled over the shell-torn ground as shrapnel and machine gun fire filled the air. The Germans who were fortunate to survive the bombardment quickly recovered and opened fire upon the advancing Canadians.

At some point during the assault, an artillery shell landed close to Ernie as he advanced across no man’s land. Shrapnel tore into his right shoulder, leaving him seriously injured. As a comrade stopped to provide aid, Ernie reporteldy told him, “Go on, I’ll manage.” These were to be Ernie’s last words to him.

Harry and the rest of the company pressed forward and left Ernie behind to wait for aid. Ernie was eventually picked up by stretcher-bearers and taken to a nearby Regimental Aid Post.  From here, men of the 8th Canadian Field Ambulance transported Ernie to the advanced dressing station at Neuville St. Vaast, where his wounds were once again treated.

On April 11, 1917, Ernie arrived at the No. 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital at Outreau, near Boloulogne. A message was dispatched to the Proven family notifying that Ernie was “dangerously ill.” The following day, on April 12, 1917, Ernie succumbed to his wounds.

Picture 1314 copy

His body was buried in the Boulogne Eastern Cemetery and news of his death was published in the April 19, 1917 edition of the Minnedosa Tribune. On May 10, the paper published a short obituary, noting that he had died “somewhere in France.”

In 1922, the village of Clanwilliam erected a monument to its war dead. Ernest Proven’s name, along with his brother, Harry Proven, are inscribed alongside the the names of the area’s twenty-seven men who died for King and Country.

Mapping the Canadian Forestry Corps in Keppernach (Scotland)

One of my more recent interests is the work of the Canadian Forestry Corps (CFC) during the First World War. The CFC was raised specifically to supply the Allied armies with a desperately-needed resource: timber. Whether it was to needed to support dugouts, hold barbed-wire, or aircraft frames, wood became one of the most basic resources of the First World War. Composed primarily of lumberjacks and foresters, the CFC eventually operated in France, England, and Scotland and succeeded in preventing a timber shortage. For a bit more of a background, you can read another of my posts here.

e010697048-v8-Construction Men, Bushmen, Sawmill Men & Chauffeurs Wanted to Join the 242nd Canadian Forestry and Pioneer Battalion -  recruitment campaign

CFC Recruiting Poster. Source: Library and Archives Canada.

The CFC was organized into numbered companies of about 100-200 men and were assigned specific forests or woodlands to cut. One of these companies, the 107th (originally No. 7), received a timber limit in Keppernach, Scotland (South of Nairn in the Scottish Highlands). The area in which the company found itself in, the Forest of Cawdor, was no comparison to the Canadian “wilderness” they had left behind. Between 1825 and 1854, over fourteen million trees had been planted here, in an area covering just over 4,000 acres. The majority of the area was populated with Scotch Fir, the most-desired wood for wartime use.1

The company’s advance party of fifteen men arrived in late July 1916 and within ten days, had a Scotch mill up and running. A Canadian mill was built in August and the mills ran almost continuously until the camp closed in August 1917. By September 1917, the company had cut 6.5 million F.B.M. (foot board measure).2

107th Company, Canadian Forestry Corps at Keppernach, Scotland. Source: Library and Archives Canada

107th Company, Canadian Forestry Corps at Keppernach, Scotland. Source: Library and Archives Canada

As I’m interested in the relationship between forests and war as well as forest regeneration, I decided to see what I could learn using GIS. Fortunately, the online war diary of the 107th Company includes a relatively uncommon map of the company’s operation at Keppernach.

Even more fortunate, when you search Keppernach in Google Maps, the first (and only) result is Keppernach Farm and takes you to the exact location the 107th Company worked in (see below). This saved me quite some time as I would have otherwise had to search all over Nairnshire for roads that matched up with my map.

 

In trying to locate some contemporary maps of the site, I discovered that Scotland, and Great Britain for that matter, has some great HGIS sources available online, notably A Vision of Britain Through Time and Old Maps Online. While some of these require you to live in Britain (A Vision of Britain) or charge for digital copies, I was able to get some high quality and detailed maps (here’s an example) from the National Library of Scotland. These maps were produced by the Ordnance Survey and published in 1905 so they provide the perfect backdrop to CFC operations in the following decade.

I then threw everything I had into Quantum GIS (QGIS) and georeferenced the maps.

KeppScreen3a

1905 Ordnance Survey Map over Google’s Satellite Imagery, showing little has changed in the last 100 years.

Then adding the CFC map (in red)…

KeppScreen4a

While the hand-drawn CFC map doesn’t line up perfectly with the other layers, it still provides a sufficient sense of what the operation looked like. I was somewhat surprised to find that from the air, it is impossible (for me at least) to tell that this forest had been completed cleared in 1917 and that the roads, pathways, and borders remain virtually unchanged. I also found it interesting in that the forested area had actually expanded (likely the result of interwar afforestation efforts brought about by the wartime shortage of timber) and that you can still make out the site of the Canadian camp (large rectangle on the left).

For the moment, this is a chance for me to refresh my GIS skills (which I apparently lost while home for the holidays) and a quick experiment to see what I can extract from the archival records. While it is very much a microhistory, I’m hoping that it will lead to some new information and insight into the role of the Canadian Forestry Corps.

Stay tuned to see what else I can find!


1. Historical Record, Keppernach Camp War Diary – 107th Company, War diaries – No. 51 District, Canadian Forestry Corps, Reel T-10901-10902, Volume 5018, Series III-D-3, RG 9, Library and Archives Canada.
2. Ibid

Canadian Forestry Corps in WWI

a003999 - PA-003999 - February 1919

Men of the Canadian Forestry Corps, February 1919. Library and Archives Canada, PA-003999.

A post of mine about the Canadian Forestry Corps in the First World War has just been posted on NiCHE’s The Otter. Based upon some of my research from last year, it briefly examines the transplanting of Canadian forestry methods to British forests. To learn more, click the link below!

Exploiting Old World Forests with New World Forestry: The Canadian Forestry Corps in the First World War